authorsarahdessen:

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

LOVE. 
ZoomInfo
authorsarahdessen:

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

LOVE. 
ZoomInfo
authorsarahdessen:

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

LOVE. 
ZoomInfo
authorsarahdessen:

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

LOVE. 
ZoomInfo

authorsarahdessen:

liquid-lightning:

librarienne:

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

I’ve reblogged this before and I will reblog it again.

This is so great

LOVE. 

Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo
Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami
Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?
I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.
In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?
I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.
Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?
Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.
Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?
I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.
ZoomInfo

Assembly - by Osamu Yokonami

Let’s talk more about Assembly. Why did you choose teenage schoolgirls as your subject?

I like imperfect yet pure and delicate things. I think teenage girls have these qualities, plus their uniforms are very beautiful! Moreover, the uniforms help me in representing the individual girls as a collective whole.

In Assembly, nature imposes as a setting featuring linear contours and a strong sense of geometry. What is the role of the natural landscape in this work?

I love incorporating nature in my photographs and leaving out man-made elements. Buildings and any other piece of architecture make it easy to identify what place you are looking at, but with nature it’s harder to guess. This allows me to work with an anonymous place. The subjects pop out more in a natural setting, too.

Is there any relationship between nature and the idea of “group” that you wanted to convey?

Nature is so simple that it brings out the collective group with great effect. I tried to keep the scene as simple as possible for this very reason.

Assembly has a strong cinematic feel to it. Does cinema inspire your work in some way?

I agree that Assembly is cinematic, but that was never my intention. It’s probably because of the light, the simple situations and the girls in motion.

The interview to Osamu Yokonami was contributed by Francesca Orsi, an Italian photography critic and curator.

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Dead End

There is no Dead End in this world.

The definition of dead end is entirely up to you, how you see it how you face it, is depends on how you solve problem in life.

When I picture dead end, I simply think of ways to get out of it. I won’t allow myself to sit and wait till I breath out the last bit of oxygen out of my body, straight to heaven. I will start exploring what is around me.

I will try to climb out , try to dig a hole or the easiest way - turn around and walk the other way, I won’t say I am repeating my route, going back to the way I came, is not repeating, because each steps you take in life is present in a different time zone, there is always a different angle to see a situation, don’t be that frog who believe the well is the world and annoy other possibility. 

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
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wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo
wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani
Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.
Read More
ZoomInfo

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Identities by Can Dagarslani

Identities is a beautiful series of images by Turkish photographer Can Dagarslani. After graduating from Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts in 1996, Dagarslani became increasingly interested in photography.

Read More

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Doors

In life there are so many doors, many doors without sign on them, exit or entrance, it is all uncertain. You may experience a chance to shut one bad door but you may not forget there are plenty more bad doors around the corner, sometime even shutting a good door is good for you, but how do I know, how do I figure it out? how do I know I made the right decision each time,how do I make sure I don’t get karma back to myself by my choice?

All these questioning suffocate me big time, hit me hard each time, I am constantly worries who is behind my back, doing what? in what position? I barely have time to stop and think of an answer. I know most of the time my first reaction is probably the worst responses to the situation I am facing, but I never hold any regrets, I always laugh at my mistakes, I have no idea where I get that part of me from, or which stage of my life I started acting that way, but every time I go with my own flow I have a big smile on my face, because I am doing things my own way.

It is human to question yourself, if we are so confident with every step we took than we are just a robot with prewritten programme that run with a push on a button. It is no point to admire people that follow ‘rules’ because you can never be someone else but yourself, the person in your body and mind.